Welcome to CloudUp! In this episode, we talk about Chrome Enterprise and Chrome devices, and how it can positively impact end user experience in healthcare, specifically how it may make doctors, nurses and other staff more mobile.

Meet the Speakers

Mitchel Steele

Mitchell Steele

Google Chrome Sales Manager

rion ellis image

Rion Ellis

Chrome Enterprise Deployment Engineer

Transcript

– A lot of times when I go to the doctor, there is a desktop in every single room, and the majority of the rooms aren’t in use, so that’s just wasted overhead. Do you need a device sitting in a room doing nothing? Or do you just have a Chromebook, flip it over like a tablet, you’re walking around, and you take it with you, just like you’re taking your patient notes or prescriptions, or if you’re taking shots in to give somebody a flu shot, just carry what you need.

– Hey, everyone, welcome to Cloud Up. On today’s episode, we’re gonna be talking about Chrome Enterprise and Chrome devices, and how that can positively impact end user experience in healthcare. So, Ryan, today, we’re talking about Chrome Enterprise, Chrome devices in healthcare, and how it might make my doctors, my patient- my doctors and my nurses and other staff, more mobile. So, I know we all know that in healthcare today, VDI is really what most people are using. So we all see the nurse, as the person doing some data entry rolls in this big cart. It’s usually got a thin client loaded on it, taking down information. There’s a battery on there, there’s a monitor, keyboard, mouse. Just seems like a lot of extra stuff that- it seems complex. So knowing that that’s what most healthcare organizations are dealing with today, how can a Chrome device help free that up?

– I would say, normally, when I think of a thin client, it’s just a really mini desktop computer that you’ll have to attach to something, or it’ll have an external monitor attached to it, and other peripherals. And then you got it on a cart, you’re wheeling that card around. And it’s still gonna be more expensive than a Chromebook. A lot of times when I go to the doctor, there is a desktop in every single room, and the majority of the rooms aren’t in use, so that’s just wasted overhead. Do you need a device sitting in a room doing nothing? Or do you just have a Chromebook, flip it over like a tablet, you’re walking around and you take it with you, just like you’re taking your patient notes or prescriptions, or if you’re taking shots in to give somebody a flu shot, just carry what you need into that room, and don’t have wasted electrical consumption, and then just devices that you then have to pay to maintain, that for a lot of times aren’t doing anything. You can do the exact same thing from a Chromebook and have all the mobility because it’s gonna be a laptop, and the freedom to walk from room to room, or floor to floor. If you get one with a touchscreen, you can actually just start writing your notes right into it. If you’ve got one of your EMR databases, you should be able to access that directly from there. And it’s a lot cheaper than, say, an HP thin client which still has an OS running on it that needs to be patched and updated. You need to protect it. So there’s a lot more overhead with that as well, even though it’s just a thin client.

– Got it, and we talked about in the last episode a bit about security, so I know from our last conversation that these devices are completely secure. There’s no data stored on them at all. So the security question that might come out of what you just said is what if someone leaves the device in the patient’s room, for example, by accident?

– I mean, that would be tragic, but you have all controls over that device if it does get lost from the organization, you can remotely wipe it. If you have it set up for a managed guest session, they will be able to just get into the machine, but then they won’t be able to do anything once they’re there, because it’s not like a full-blown Chrome OS at that point in time, it’s literally just a single app that was launched, which would then require you to log into the VDI solution. So if you didn’t have the creds, it’s basically useless, and as long as it’s online, from the admin panel, you could just remote wipe that device, and it would literally turn into a paperweight.

– Yeah, and the way most hospitals are using Chrome devices today, they’re running it in managed guest just like you said.

– Yep.

– When I open the device, assuming you’re in VDI, which most healthcare organizations are, the first thing you see is that VDI login screen, and that device is paperweight. There’s nothing on it. They could pop the hard drive out. It is use fully encrypted at rest, so you don’t need to worry about anything there.

– Correct.

– Also one more. Most Chrome devices have eight to 12 hour battery life, so-

– Ah, yes.

– For an entire’s doctor shift, they should most likely to be able to carry that device the entire time, and not have to worry about it dying halfway through the shift, or switching out devices. If it does, there’s plenty of solutions out there that they can simply set that device down, pick up another one, and not lose where they were at. They can just hop right back into their VDI session. They’re not having to boot up a new machine, reopen all their stuff. It’s all still there, ready to go.

– Yeah, like, realistically, I think if I was running a small practice, I would have a grab-and-go cart of just a bunch of Chromebooks sitting there waiting, and nothing in the room. And I would just say, ope, when you grab your- and right next to the charts, right? So you walk in, you grab your chart, grab your Chromebook, and then you do your patient visit.